Trudeau wastes $42 million on gun ‘buy back’ that doesn’t work

 

Somehow, the Trudeau Liberals have figured out how to spend $42 million on a “gun buyback” program that hasn’t seen the government take ownership of a single gun.

It takes a special kind of incompetence to spend four years and $42 million on a government priority and accomplish the square root of nothing.

According to a story broken by my National Post colleague Bryan Passifiume, that’s where we are though, four years after Justin Trudeau said he was acting to make Canadians safer.

On May 1, 2020, just days after the Nova Scotia mass murder that left 22 people dead and injured many more, Trudeau said his government was banning “assault-style” guns.  At first, he announced that 1,500 types of guns would be banned by a cabinet decree with legislation to follow.

He already knew when he made this announcement that guns used by the killer, Gabriel Wortman, were illegally smuggled in from the United States. Trudeau also knew by that point that police had been warned about Wortman’s tendency towards violence and his illegal gun collection and had done nothing.

Of course, what he was banning were not guns made for military use, they were for hunting and sport shooting. Trudeau also knew that the biggest problem for gun violence in Canada were the guns smuggled across the border, not the guns in the basements and gun safes of Canada’s more than 2 million legal, licenced gun owners.

Still, he pushed ahead with plans for a so-called “gun buyback” but could never figure out how to make it work.

Since the start of their efforts, the Trudeau Liberals have turned to the RCMP, the Canadian Armed Forces, provincial police forces in Ontario and Quebec, Canada Post and more to try and find partners to try and help collect these now banned forearms.

The national and provincial police services simply don’t have the time or resources to deal with this and the military is not equipped. As for Canada Post, does it make sense to have gun owners take their AR-15s to the Canada Post outlet at their local pharmacy?

According to the Trudeau government’s response to an order paper question from Senator Don Plett, there are currently 60 staff from Public Safety Canada working on devising the program and 15 RCMP officers also assisting. That’s 75 staff, costing a lot of money and, thankfully, not delivering anything.

There are also two employees at Service Canada working full-time on the file and in what can only be described as the epitome of government speak, “the equivalent of 5.825 full-time employees” from Public Services and Procurement Canada.

“This is a boondoggle, and it hasn’t even begun,” Plett said Friday during the Senate question period.”

“How can your government have spent $42 million on this, when not a single firearm has been bought back?”

 

Senator Marc Gold stood to defend the government’s actions by saying, “it is hard to put a value on a life.”

“Every gun that is not in circulation, that cannot be used to create and to cause injury to individuals and their families is worth the investment,” Gold said.

Worth the investment?

This is $42 million spent trying to design a system to take guns away, not from criminals, but from law-abiding, legal, licenced gun owners. Imagine what that $42 million could have accomplished if spent on increasing capabilities at the border to stop gun smuggling.

This plan from Trudeau, to ban the 1,500 rifle variants, was always about politics and not results. Four years later, we have the proof, plenty of money spent, lots of heated rhetoric, no results.